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The Fixation Problem

As I mature (I opted for this rather than “grow older”), I am discovering very few decisions I make must be made at a specific moment.  When we can conclude we are not really “hostages of the moment,” we grant ourselves the opportunity to place our impending decision in its true context.  We can look around at what else is occurring in our life, we can talk to trusted friends, and we have the ability as believers in Jesus Christ to spend some time actually praying about our situation.

 

Fighter pilots are some of the most talented multi-taskers in the world.  They are flying a multi-million-dollar machine, capable of doling out unimaginable destruction on whatever target they choose.  Today, pilots have access to a mind-boggling amount of data presented to them through screens, auditory signals, and HUD’s.  All the while, they can be hurtling through the air at speeds far exceeding the sound barrier.USAF F-16

 

One of the most dangerous problems a fighter pilot of today’s modern aircraft can face is something called target fixation.  Target fixation occurs when the pilot becomes fixated on an approaching target—whether another airplane or a ground target—and their concentration causes them to lose the ability to comprehend where they are in time and space.

 

When this occurs, the pilot doesn’t realize how quickly they are closing on their target.  They have forgotten to pay attention to where they are, and more importantly, how close they are getting to their target!  Because of this fixation, the distance between them and their target goes unnoticed and ultimately they can fly into the very target they are trying to destroy—a bad day all around!

 

Few of us are pilots; so, it is unlikely we would ever be subjected to the circumstances producing this kind of target fixation.  Yet all of us are guilty of being far too close to our problems and losing any sense of importance and context.

 

Up close, all problems look huge because we cannot have any sense of perspective.  How can we, since all we can see is the problem?  A crisis this large demands an immediate response!  This person at work could ruin our career!  My wife doesn’t understand how necessary this motorcycle is to how I define myself!  The salesman will sell it to someone else if I don’t buy it now!

 

The writer of Hebrews 12:2 in the New Testament of the Bible writes this: “Keeping our eyes on Jesus, the source and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy that lay before Him endured a cross and despised the shame and has sat down at the right hand of God’s throne.”

 

Many people would understand and even acknowledge that Jesus Christ is our example in how to live our lives.  These same people would, however, never believe their situation deserves to be included under the example of the life Jesus lived.  Yet in this verse, there are two very important points.

 

First, the writer opens with a command to those who have a relationship with Jesus: we are to keep our eyes on Him!  Why?  Because He is the source of our faith (Acts 4:12: “There is salvation in no one else”) and His life completed or finished a life of perfection and obedience to the Father (“perfecter of our faith”).

 

Second, what motivated Jesus Christ to be able to be our example?  Because Jesus saw the problem which was before Him on the cross but He also could see the “joy that lay before Him” because He looked past the suffering of the cross (unimaginably horrible yet brief in comparison to eternity) to the eternal glory of being at the Father’s right hand on His throne!

 

The next time a decision “just has to be made this moment,” let us remind ourselves to keep our eyes on Jesus!  None of us are facing a cross or even death.  Yet if we make the choice to discipline ourselves to keep our eyes focused on Jesus Christ, we will never again fixate and obsess on a problem and crash into it!

 

No problem is ever longer than eternity; our bigger than Jesus Christ!

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The Ugly Christian Part 3

Is there Acceptable Collateral Damage?

 

 

The term “collateral damage” was unknown prior to about 1970.  The terms specific meaning is tied directly to war and the idea of “elements not directly associated with an intended target being damaged or destroyed as a result of a specific action.”  From the first Gulf War until the most recent action in Afghanistan, our military has taken great pains to develop “smart” bombs which are able to pinpoint their targets with a minimum of collateral damage.

 

A large amount of material, expense and effort is expended to identify what is an appropriate target and what is not.  Of course the enemy, knowing America and her allies desire to not harm those deemed to be non-combatants, will often set-in-place their operations in the midst of schools, hospitals and mosques in order to insulate them from attack.  Of course, far too often the press overlooks this callous disregard to life and put all the more pressure on those who desire to eradicate the threat.

 

Perhaps one of the sharpest aspects of the double-edged sword of war is militaries—unless of course they are being utilized by a dictatorship—often find themselves fighting against an antagonistic camera and press as often as an enemy action.  Such is the nature of war in our modern milieu.

 

Christianity is also involved in warfare.  Of course, the Bible makes it abundantly clear our warfare is not waged against “flesh and blood” combatants, but rather in the spiritual realm; one unseen and filled not merely with spirits, but with ideas and philosophies.  What manifests itself in the physical realm—whether in the form of atrocity, sin, death and immorality—is but a result of what is and has already occurred in the spiritual realm.

 

One of the scourges of our society is “abortion-on-demand” which has been available since the 1973 Supreme Court ruling.  I am unashamedly pro-life; the Bible teaches we are made in God’s image and life begins not merely with conception (which is our only means of observation as humans) but life is something ordained by God who is the Creator of all that lives.  As a Christian and a pastor, God expects me to not merely believe this, but also to proclaim this through my life and teaching.Abortion Protest signs

People are a complex mechanism.  By God’s design no two of us are alike.  We do have commonalities which are measurable across the masses of society (a reason for the existence of the disciplines of psychology, sociology and even history) and these provide us with incredible insight into human nature.  If my desire is to communicate the message of Scripture—what Christians refer to as the ‘good news” (Gospel) of God’s love for us and His desires for us—I cannot then ignore the reality of human nature.

 

One of the most difficult things we are faced with as believers in Jesus Christ is our call to “hate the sin” (action, attitude, idea, and philosophy) but also “love the sinner.”  I have heard those outside of Christianity scoff and ridicule this concept; they believe it is impossible to separate the individual from what the individual does (there is a whole economy built on the existence of this concept—this also ensures people will always be “defined” and “enslaved” by their sin and issues as well).  Again, I defer to what Jesus taught: “With men this is impossible, but with God all things are possible.”

 

Those who proclaim and claim the name of Jesus Christ are capable of getting “caught up in the emotion of the moment” just like anyone else.  The difference between those who have a relationship with Christ and those who do not is this: those who have a relationship with God the Father through the work of Christ have both the Holy Spirit and God’s Word to constantly judge and check their own actions.  One of the hardest to remember is that we are to “love the sinner.”

 

It is far too easy to simply allow hate to season our speech and actions.  Standing outside of abortion clinics with signs proclaiming “Abortion is Murder” and the like makes as much sense as standing outside of funeral homes with signs stating “Sin Kills!”  Abortion is murder—I agree completely!  Yet is it actually loving to paint with such a broad brush that we alienate those who are captives of their own circumstances and decisions?  Oh, and let’s not overlook the incredible sense of love fostered by those holding those signs.

 

Our churches need to communicate they are more of a place of refuge for the hurting and injured rather than a staging point for those with a desire to be “culture warriors.”  We are no more in a war with culture than a fish is at war with water!  We can battle ideas and philosophies, we can tend to the wounded and we should confront those who actively engage in what the Bible describes as sin.  Yet as we do all of these things, we cannot fail to communicate the love by which we are motivated!

 

Jesus Christ came into this world as a baby.  The Lord of Creation, the One who by His very hand created all there is and by His very existence holds all of reality together, came into a world as one of us.  He struggled as He grew; He worked in order to provide for food and clothing for Himself and His family.  He formed relationships with those around Him and the Bible tells us He grew in “wisdom and stature” with God and people.

 

His ministry was marked with compassion, healing, confrontation of sin and wrong and ultimately, He proved His love through His action: He died so those who believe in Him might live forever with Him.  The reason His words were accepted is because His love was clearly demonstrated; even the crusty Centurion who stood at the foot of His cross when He died stated “surely He was the Son of God.”

 

If Christians desire people to take us seriously, we are going to have to seriously love them!

Criminal Thinking

Criminal Thinking

 

Crime dramas have been a major fare of TV viewing diets since the 1950’s.  Whether a show opens “On a dark and rainy night,” or we are ushered into a crime scene as the crime occurs in medias res, the crime drama continues to draw viewers.

 

Yet here’s an observation I have made: while watching a particular, unnamed drama which would fall into the above mentioned category, I noticed while the characters have no scruples about “blowing away” a bad guy with a gun intent on harming someone, no one—and I mean no one—is allowed to head-shoot the crazed dog trying to take a bite out of one of the characters portraying a cop at the order of the above-mentioned bad guy!

 

Fido with fangs gets to live; Guido the killer pimp does not.

 

Now you may be thinking, “Hey dude, it’s not the dogs fault!  I mean, dude, it was trained that way!”

 

You may believe I desire to see Fido (Fee-Fee, Rover, Claude-the Killer-Cat, whatever) get whacked, I don’t.  My wife and I are owned by five cats (“Please, call me ‘The Litter Whisperer’”) and we treat them like family—we love our cats!  My observation here has to do more with perceived value and balance.

Fritz & Murphy

Fritz & Murphy

 

There are laws and caveats always protecting the mistreatment of animals.  Animals are viewed as innocent, as creatures in need of our care and stewardship so we should not do anything which could be construed as cruelty to them.  We do not desire, as a people, to communicate anything which would denigrate and devalue the life of animals.

 

I’m good with this.  I love my animals and I have given up even the slightest desire to hunt because of my feelings in this matter.  I believe it’s fine for others to hunt, but I cannot.  My issues are more with my total dislike of death—especially death in which I would be a cause.  Yet while I personally do not desire to cause any unwanted death (yessiree, I’m one of those people who honk and brake for squirrels), I would not hesitate to make the choice between a fang-laden Cujo and me; I win and Cujo gets whacked!

 

So here’s my concern: we go out of our way not to ever show an animal being hurt, but we have no issues with shooting holes in people, with someone shot bleeding out of their mouth and with news people taking pictures of the aftermath of the Boston Bombings and putting them on the news and Internet.

 

Am I missing something?

 

Who have we become as a people?  Lines will form with angry voices screaming at the mistreatment of animals, there are cries for baby whales, walruses and seals, yet we receive nothing but silence (and occasionally applause) over the depiction of human death and dismemberment.  Are we to be extolled for protecting animals all the while we allow the wholesale slaughter of humanity–portrayed with fictional characters or in real life?

 

Has anyone ever thought this is a reflection of our values rather than an attempt to influence them?

 

I mean, really?